UPDATED 
August 10, 2014




BOARD MEMBERS

Ed Russo                            

                                               President

I was appointed to the Transit Police Department on May 3rd 1965 and retired on a regular service retirement on July 4th 1986.  During my 21 years with the department,
I was assigned primarily to District 20.  In December 1983, I was awarded “The Cop Of The Month Award” for apprehending a suspect that had held up 13 banks in the New York area over the past year.  From 1980 to 1986, I served on the executive board of the Columbia Association as Recording Secretary.  I would like to see the Retiree Association grow and bring back the members who left us over the years.

Mike Lanning        

                                      1st Vice-President

I came on the job April 1965 and retired in September of 1986, without VSF. I served as Trustee for the TPBA for 12 years in Queens. I also worked in Dist. 1,20,21,22. I served on the Retiree Executive Board for 6 yrs as your recording secretary. I’ve been employed at St. Francis Hospital for the last 4 yrs. and I’m happily married to my wife Doris for the past 40 years and we have 5 beautiful grandchildren. I love the Transit Police Department and will always be Retired Transit Police. I think that the new board will do great as long as we keep focused on what we want to do for the Membership because they are the ones who run this. We have to listen to what road they want us to follow and try to do it, but we also have to head where it is best for the organization

Harry Hassler        

                             2nd Vice President

I am very honored to have been asked to serve as your 2nd Vice President
.
I promise that, with God's help, I will serve this association of heroes to the best of my ability.

I was asked to write a short bio to introduce myself, so here it is: I was appointed on May 3, 1965 at the age of 21. After graduating from the Jamaica Armory, it was steady 8Ps on the No.7 Flushing line for the remainder of the Worlds Fair. Then it was District 3 for a few months, then District 1 for a year. At the end of 1966, I went to District 22 and steady 8Ps for two years. In 1967, it was train and station patrol in District 20 that lasted until I made Sergeant in 1974 when I served as a Sergeant in District 4 until 1980.

During 1980 & 1981, I was an instructor at the Gold St. Academy and the Academy annex at 20th Street. I went back to District 4 at the end of 1981 and continued in uniformed patrol until 1985. I was planning my retirement, but in February of 1985, I was indicted with five other cops in the case of Michael Stewart vs. NYCTP.

After 20 years on patrol, I finally got a detail and was transferred to the Communications Unit. After being acquitted, I was kept on modified duty pending other investigations. After being passed over for promotion three times, I was promoted to Lieutenant on the last day of the Lt's. list. I stayed in the C.U. until 1988 when I became C.O. of that prestigious and legendary unit, the Revenue Protection Division. In 1991, I was promoted to Captain. My last day on the job was my son Bill's first day on the job. On July 2, 1992, I swore my son in and said "Good bye" to a great police department. They swore me in on May 3, 1965, but they never swore me out. That's why, in my heart, I am still a Transit Cop, and always will be!

Ron DiMaio              

                            Executive Secretary

There is an old saying, that when at work, “If you like what you’re doing, you will never work a day in your life”. I know the feeling.

When I was 14 years old, growing up in Brooklyn, I joined the Metropolitan Rod and Gun Club with my friend Bob. I would take my rifle in a case and travel by subway to the club where I learned rifle marksmanship. I enjoyed the sport so much that I competed in matches and even brought home some trophies. Back then, I also went hunting with my friends, my son, brother-in-law and father-in-law. Unfortunately, climbing mountains to hunt is too strenuous for me now, but since then, target shooting has been my life-long hobby. I also taught my wife, Rita, my son, Raymond, and my daughter, Lauren, how to shoot. When I moved out to Long Island, I joined the Freeport Rifle and Revolver Association, where I practice rifle and pistol target shooting. I make this my time out with my son.

My career with the NYC Transit Police Department spanned nearly 21 years. (Class of June 21, 1965) During that time, I worked on patrol in the following Districts: 30, 33, 31, 34, 22, 11, Records, Communications and Operations Units and met many good people. But when the opportunity arose to be assigned to the Range and the Firearms Training Unit at Gold Street, I jumped at it. I will never forget my first day at the Range; I was happy because I was given six .38 Spl. service revolvers to clean by Rudy Zubikowski. Rudy could not understand why I was happy for this assignment as I truly enjoyed handling the tools of my hobby, therefore, it didn’t seem like work to me. During almost three years at the Range, I met some celebrities like Sylvester Stallone and Billy D. Williams in the making of the movie Night Hawks and Meredith Vierra from the media who interviewed us. But most of all, I worked with some great guys including: Sgts. John Cullen, Bob White and William Carroll and P.O.s Rudy Zubikowski, Tony Borgese, Henry Melchiona, Dick Sorge, Cardinal (Tony) Campbell, Donald Parks, and I.W. Smith who was killed in the line of duty.

My most rewarding accomplishment on the job was to train new recruits, some of whom had never handled a gun before. A few of them, especially the women, almost quit “the job” because they were fearful of the gun and they were also afraid of not being able to qualify. I trained them to use the tool they needed to master in order to qualify, the revolver. The recruits were grateful for my patience and skills in training them so they were able to qualify. After being promoted to Sergeant in April 1982, I had to leave my “Home on the Range”, where I felt like I wasn’t really working because I was doing what I liked to do. I was reassigned to TPF Patrol and four years later, on January 31, 1986, I retired.

Robert Valentino                     Recording Secretary

Under construction

Bio to follow

Gregory Stripp                             Financial Secretary

Under construction

Bio to follow

Anthony Lomanto              

                        Treasurer & Webmaster

I was appointed to the NYC Transit Police Department on December 1, 1965 as part of the largest class ever in the Department. After graduation, I was assigned to rotating in Dist. 1 then into the O/U on restricted duty thanks to a bleeding ulcer.  After getting back to full duty, I remained in the O/U for a while then went back to Dist. 1, and eventually back to the O/U.  That lasted until 1969 when I was sent to TFU in Dist. 34A until its' end in 1976.  After a short stay in Dist. 32, I finally came "home" to Dist. 34, Stillwell Avenue, the "End of the line." During my time in D/34, I was elected Delegate, area Trustee, and ended as Delegate until my retirement in January, 1986. I also served as a Trustee of the Annuity Fund of the PBA for several years. I was married to my second wife, Shirley, from 1982 until her death in 2012. Between us, we have four children and four grandchildren. After a stint in the limousine business, jewelery industry security and six years in retail (Woodworker's Warehouse, Home Depot, Lowe's) I went back into uniform, currently working security at St. Francis Hospital in Roslyn, LI, NY, alongside many fine retired Transit Police Officers. I am proud to have been asked to be this web site's Webmaster and hope to utilize what skills I have to maintain this site for the enjoyment of our members, friends, and Internet visitors. In a final thought, I would like to see all retired Transit Police Officers united under the banner of this association.In 2004, I took over the office of Treasurer, following in the foot steps of John Regan and Frank Crisa.  I now know how hard a job they encountered and I appreciate all the help they have and wil l be giving me, but I can say that I do enjoy the time at the computer.  Best to all.

 Frank Crisa                             

                                              Editor-in-Chief

I was appointed to the Transit Police Department on December 1st, 1965, and Dist.1 was my first assignment after graduation.  This was a great place to learn the job; I got most of my experience right there. I remember getting off the downtown A train at 42nd & 8th on my first tour of duty in my brand new blue uniform. When I got to the upper mezzanine to make my on-post ring someone yelled “Man with a gun." There I was, right in the thick of it. Making an arrest in those days was a trial and error learning process.  I learned quickly!

Later on I volunteered for assignment to the Coney Island Summer Squad.  I really enjoyed getting out of the “hole” and into the fresh air every summer. I don’t know how many summers I did there, but they were all great and I made many great friends. I hoped that maybe someday I would have the seniority to pick Dist 34.  When I finally made it to the “Country Club”, I got a call from (then) Lt. Rodney Ward. He told me I was being assigned to City Wide Anti-Crime. Damn, I just got the District of my dreams and I didn’t want to go.  Anyway, as I had no choice, I packed my bags and headed back to Manhattan and The Bronx. This assignment turned out to be the best five or six years on the job for me. Thanks Rodney.

When that unit was disbanded, I wound up back at the “34 House." To make a long story short; Chief James Ferry (then Lt. Ferry) took me under his wing and assigned me to many administrative duties in the command.  Under his very capable stewardship I learned the techniques necessary to become a good administrator. Thanks Jim. This knowledge, the ability to get along with people and, of course, being a Transit Cop, afforded me the experience that I took with me into my civilian career. I’ve been pretty lucky in that area. I became the Director of Security at Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, New York.  I’ve served at Pratt since October of 1987, first as the Assistant Director of Security then in May 1995, I was promoted to Director.  

I finally retired to "the good life" in 2007. No regrets, a great wife, great kids and great grand-kids; life is good.

In closing, I should say that I was honored to serve for seven years as Treasurer of our fine association.  During that time I enjoyed putting together “Beyond the Line” as our Association’s newsletter. It really caught on and the feedback I get tells me the troops enjoy reading it. However, the demands of being on the executive board consumed too much of my personal time, so I decided not to seek re-election. Your new executive board asked me to stay on and continue to do the newsletter and I’m happy to do it.  I think this organization should get the respect and loyalty it deserves. Many good things have come directly from the hard work of past administrations that directly affect the quality of our lives.  Please continue to support us so we can move forward.
Fraternally,
Frank Crisa

 Ed Wilko                                                Sergeant-at-Arms

Under construction

  Bio to follow